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"The McCoy lane looking west. This 1912 photo [says 1911 on verso of photo] shows the front part of the Hotel on the left, [on the right] the blacksmith shop, the big red barn and the front of the old log barn and beyond it, the bridge across Rock Creek. The big barn, approximately fifty by sixty feet in size, was of frame construction and built by C. H. McCoy in 1902. It had stalls for twenty horses and a loft that held ten tons of loose hay....
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Charles, Chet, John and William (father) Eaton (left to right) at McCoy Creek Ranch. Each Eaton is holding the reins of a horse and is standing in front of a log barn. [Title supplied from catalog prepared by the Eagle County Historical Society.]
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Doug Hughes and Maybelle "Dickie" Yandell across the valley from Squaw Creek. Dickie is Doug's aunt, Melba's sister. "Melba Yandell Hughes and her family came to Squaw Creek because of the lettuce. Melba had been married when her family lived in Oklahoma, and had lost her husband after their son, Doug, was born. Eldest of eight children, Melba moved back home so her son could enjoy family life and the attention of all those brothers and sisters--actually,...
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"Lettuce fertilizer plots, experimental farm, Avon. Elevation, 8,000 feet." In: High Altitude Vegetable Growing: Lettuce--Cauliflower--Peas, by R. A. McGinty. Fort Collins, Colorado Experiment Station, Horticultural Division, Bulletin No. 309, May, 1926. p.10.
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"The Bill Johannbroer Ranch on Conger Mesa in 1970." -- McCoy Memoirs, p. 235 "Billy Johannbroer was a locomotive engineer on the Clear Creek Branch of the Colorado and Southern Railroad. He did very little active work on his homestead. His wife and children, Bill, Lillian and Kenneth, were the chief ranchers with Billy only being able to help during his vacations and during slack railroad seasons. Bill Jr. married Verna Ray, daughter of Daniel...
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Brush Creek Valley, 1916. Two groups of buildings, fenced pasture and Brush Creek visible with Bellyache Mountain in the background.
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The Buchholz Livery Stable in Eagle, Colorado. The stable is in disrepair, soon to be demolished (October 1929). Nicholas (d. 1911) and John (d. 1932) Buchholz ran the livery business for many years.
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Imogene Nottingham (later Mrs. Frank Doll) standing with pet deer. Lettuce shed in right background. Child on horse in left background. Photo taken from Emmett Nottingham place in Avon facing northwest. Metcalf Gulch (not in GNIS) visible behind the lettuce shed. [Title supplied from catalog prepared by the Eagle County Historical Society.]
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The Chambers Ranch at the mouth of Eby Creek in Eagle, Colorado. The white barn became the museum for the Eagle County Historical Society. The site with the buildings is now the Eagle interchange for I-70. [Title supplied from catalog prepared by the Eagle County Historical Society.]
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Photo postcard of the C. F. Lloyd Ranch. The Eagle River is at midfield, in front of the ranch buildings. C. F. Lloyd is written on the barn roof. ”Chicago businessman Clyde Lloyd purchased the Sherman Brothers Ranch (east of town) in 1922. He and his stepson Wayne T. Jones called the operation ’Red Mountain Ranch’ and were known for annually hosting one of the largest Hereford sales in the state. Clyde’s brother and sister-in-law, Carl and...
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Two men standing next to a horse. The man on the left has his arms crossed on his chest; the man on the right is holding the horse's bridle. All three are posed in front of a barn. Scrap lumber is visible and the barn door is open.
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"In some respects similar to the preceeding picture [1992.004A.084], but taken about 1924. Trees obstruct a view of the Hotel and several buildings in back of it that haver never shown in any of the many photographs of McCoy. The little building in the foreground has served as living quarters for a number of people in past years, but is presently the McCoy Post Office. The small white building on the left was built by the Brooks Brothers in 1914....
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Loading 100# sacks of potatoes onto wagon at the Shryack Place (also called the Mosher Place) on lower Brush Creek. From there, the sacks would be taken to "spud" cellars. Two horse team is pulling the wagon; farm buildings in left background.
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View looking southwest from the Black Mountain Ranch in the direction of Castle Peak. [Title supplied from catalog prepared by the Eagle County Historical Society.]
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The Black Mountain Ranch at this time had about 50 acres under cultivation, the balance of the 1,100 acres was pasture and timberland....John Ambos and his mother put in twenty years of hard work here, before selling the place to Willard Atwood in the spring of 1941. -- McCoy Memoirs, p. 245 "The main part of the ranch house on the Black Mountain Ranch was built by Tony Johannbroer in 1910, and the addition by John Ambos in 1928. Tony and his wife...
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Ernest and Helen Rundell, outside the house at the ranch on Sheephorn Creek. Helen is standing on a chair with Ernest helping to steady her.
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Elizabeth Holden, seated on horse, holding the infant Peggy Mulnix (Anna's daughter) in front of her in the saddle. Barn in Background. [Title supplied from catalog prepared by the Eagle County Historical Society.]
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Peggy Mulnix, daughter of Anna Mulnix, in an Oats bucket in front of the Holden barn. The fence in the background appears to be leaning considerably. [Title supplied from catalog prepared by the Eagle County Historical Society.]
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"No doubt, quite a number of ranchers still living will remember that Grandaddy of all winters, 1919-1920 when stockmen were forced to start feeding hay a month earlier than usual and only a very few had enough feed to see their stock through the winter and a late, late Spring. Several cattlemen of the McCoy area were out of hay before the first of April, when there was still from twelve to thirty inches of snow on the ground. Rather than seeing their...