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Grant Deeble and Joe Dice standing next to horses in front of the bunk house at the Schlutter Place. Flat bed wagon is on the right, hay wagon is at left foreground. Taken during hunting season.
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"The Horn ranch house on Rock Creek, two and one half miles above McCoy, as it was in 1917. Homesteaders Alvin Hart and Rooks built the cabin with the fireplace, the rest was added on by the Horns. The low building on the right was the kitchen, the two story addition had two bedrooms upstairs and the ground floor was the living room, the fireplace room served as a bunkhouse for ranch hands. Shortly after Arthur Horn's death, Mrs. Horn had that...
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A pregnant Blanche Wyatt Kavanaugh leans against a building. She is wearing a coat open over a dress. Various ranch buildings are in the background. A wagon with hay is at midground, pitchfork leaning against the side.
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Vernon Mann and Carl Eaton, left to right, seated on horses at the Wiltshire Place. Wagon and cart behind the riders, in addition to log out-buildings. [Title supplied from catalog prepared by the Eagle County Historical Society.]
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Albert Smith, wearing overalls and a hat, standing next to the bunkhouse. Wagon tongue leaning against building. [Title supplied from catalog prepared by the Eagle County Historical Society.]
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The John J. Ambos homestead and cabin. [Title supplied from catalog prepared by the Eagle County Historical Society.]
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"The McCoy lane looking west. This 1912 photo [says 1911 on verso of photo] shows the front part of the Hotel on the left, [on the right] the blacksmith shop, the big red barn and the front of the old log barn and beyond it, the bridge across Rock Creek. The big barn, approximately fifty by sixty feet in size, was of frame construction and built by C. H. McCoy in 1902. It had stalls for twenty horses and a loft that held ten tons of loose hay....
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"In some respects similar to the preceeding picture [1992.004A.084], but taken about 1924. Trees obstruct a view of the Hotel and several buildings in back of it that haver never shown in any of the many photographs of McCoy. The little building in the foreground has served as living quarters for a number of people in past years, but is presently the McCoy Post Office. The small white building on the left was built by the Brooks Brothers in 1914....
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Loading 100# sacks of potatoes onto wagon at the Shryack Place (also called the Mosher Place) on lower Brush Creek. From there, the sacks would be taken to "spud" cellars. Two horse team is pulling the wagon; farm buildings in left background.
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The garage, blacksmith shop, bunkhouse and chicken house at the Offerson place. A wagon is parked at midground, under a large tree. [Title supplied from catalog prepared by the Eagle County Historical Society.]
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"Abandoned horse drawn farm equipment on the Ebert Ranch." -- McCoy Memoirs, p. 260 The two-story Ebert ranch house is at far right background. [Title supplied from catalog prepared by the Eagle County Historical Society.]
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Same as 1992.004A.084; p.95 of John Ambos' McCoy Memoirs Former main road that passed in front of the McCoy Hotel, crossed Rock Creek, and continued along the Colorado River towards Burns. Wagon and buggy teams are tied up at the fencing Several people are standing, one is seated on a horse. Barn and resort are visible as are the bridge supports crossing over the creek. Road continues in the right background. [Title supplied from catalog prepared...
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c.1932: W. H. "Dad" Wellington shown in mail wagon, with his donkey, "Jack" standing next to the railroad crossing sign at Edwards. Lettuce shed is on the far left, with stacks of crates. Wellington hauled mail from the railroad to the Edwards Post Office twice a day for over 42 yrs. "He has driven this route, carrying the mail for forty-four years, since May 13, 1895, without missing a single trip. He makes three each day. He calls his mule...