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Looking down on Black Mountain Ranch from Sawmill Mountain. The sawmill was located at the foot of the mountain and Dick Webb was the sawmill operator. Photo taken January 1936. [Title supplied from catalog prepared by the Eagle County Historical Society.]
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Looking down on Black Mountain Ranch sitting above low clouds, 1936. The ranch house is at far right, barns and outbuildings to the left. [Title supplied from catalog prepared by the Eagle County Historical Society.]
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"Black Mountain, el. 10,000 and the ranch, shortly after Judge M. Lyle had purchased the property and converted it into a guest ranch." -- McCoy Memoirs, p. 248 [Title supplied from catalog prepared by the Eagle County Historical Society.]
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Biew of Black Mountain Ranch in February 1939. Animal is grazing at far right. [Title supplied from catalog prepared by the Eagle County Historical Society.]
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"The ranch buildings on what later became the Black Mountain Ranch. When this picture was taken in 1935 [photo has both 1934 and 1936 written on it], it was a working ranch (with emphasis on work) and had about fifty acres under cultivation, the balance of the 1,100 acres was pasture and timberland. Pioneers named the hill in the background Sawmill Mountain. Until 1915 the hill was a paradise for grouse and to see fifty or sixty in a flock was...
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The John J. Ambos homestead and cabin. [Title supplied from catalog prepared by the Eagle County Historical Society.]
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The Black Mountain Ranch at this time had about 50 acres under cultivation, the balance of the 1,100 acres was pasture and timberland....John Ambos and his mother put in twenty years of hard work here, before selling the place to Willard Atwood in the spring of 1941. -- McCoy Memoirs, p. 245 "The main part of the ranch house on the Black Mountain Ranch was built by Tony Johannbroer in 1910, and the addition by John Ambos in 1928. Tony and his wife...
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"No doubt, quite a number of ranchers still living will remember that Grandaddy of all winters, 1919-1920 when stockmen were forced to start feeding hay a month earlier than usual and only a very few had enough feed to see their stock through the winter and a late, late Spring. Several cattlemen of the McCoy area were out of hay before the first of April, when there was still from twelve to thirty inches of snow on the ground. Rather than seeing their...
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The John Ambos homestead on Congor Mesa, March 20, 2008 (looking northeast). "The Ambos ranch buildings on Conger Mesa in 1907. John Schiller, a Yampa carpenter, did the finishing work on the house after the logs were laid up. Members of the Ambos family lived here until 1919. Among others who occupied it after that date were: the Warren Henry and Hugh Norman families; Shorty Anderson and his son-in-law, Patscheck. Charley and Mildred Cock were...
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The John Ambos Ranch on Congor Mesa in the foreground with the Martin Schomers Ranch in the background. Martin Schomers was among the last to homestead on the Congor Mesa. "Schomers died of tick fever in May of 1940 after being ill only a short time. The children fell heir to his property but since two were still minors, the estate was not settled until 1944. During the intervening time Darrell Ray, who was married to Helen Schomers in 1939, operated...
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"Now the Black Mountain Ranch, this was formerly the Helene Johannbroer Homestead as it looked when Katherine Johannbroer Butler inherited it from her mother in 1912. The building in the upper left hand corner was built by Ralph McClochlin about 1900, but served as a homestead cabin for Helene." -- McCoy Memoirs p.267 Kate Butler sold her ranch in 1920 to John Ambos, Jr., and the Butlers moved to Steamboat Springs. [Title supplied from catalog...