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A panoramic view of Smeltertown, near Salida, Colorado. Bob Rush Collection.
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For about 29 months, the 365-foot smokestack did the job for which it was intended, but financial hard times forced the company to close in 1920. The short 85-foot stack beside the tall one was razed in the late 1920’s to provide brick for at least a couple of homes in Salida. Frank Thomson Collection.
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Unidentified workers who built the 365-foot smokestack grin happily as they pose with their boss, assistant superintendent Arthur Thompson, atop the stack November 14, 1917, during a simple topping out ceremony held that day. Thompson placed a silver dollar in the wet mortar of the last few bricks. Town clerk Bertie Roney, the first woman to the top of the stack, was hoisted in the materials bucket. Because she isn’t in any of the photos taken that...
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Wet mortar, a trowel and unfinished brick-work in the foreground show the last stage of construction November 14, 1917. Southwest of the new stack is the old stack continuing to spew smoke over the valley. It was torn down a short time after the new smokestack was completed. The view from 365 feet up gives a good idea of the layout of D&RG and company rails. Frank Thomson Collection.
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Arthur Thompson, smelter assistant superintendent, and Emil Bruderlin, structural engineer, perch on the lip of the new smokestack at Smeltertown during the topping-out ceremony. The large material bucket and one leg of the hoisting windlass show how materials reached the top. The wooden construction floor is a plug inserted inside the 17 foot diameter of the smokestack mouth. Bruderlin sits on a stack of bricks used for the last course of masonry....
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The view from the top of the 365-foot smokestack in Smeltertown, Colorado.
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Wet mortar, a trowel and unfinished brick-work in the foreground show the last stage of construction November 14, 1917. Southwest of the new stack is the old stack continuing to spew smoke over the valley. It was torn down a short time after the new smokestack was completed. The view from 365 feet up gives a good idea of the layout of D&RG and company rails. This image is from the Salida Centennial Photo Collection.
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For about 29 months, the 365-foot smokestack did the job for which it was intended, but financial hard times forced the company to close in 1920. The short 85-foot stack beside the tall one was razed in the late 1920’s to provide brick for at least a couple of homes in Salida. This image is from the Salida Centennial Photo Collection.
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The view from the top of the 365-foot stack at Smeltertown. This image is from the Salida Centennial Photo Collection.