Showing 1 - 6 of 6 , query time: 0.01s
Cover Image
Format:
Collection
The town of Durango was created by Denver and Rio Grande Railroad Company to process ore from the mines in nearby towns and the railroad has been a significant factor in the town from 1882 until now. According to the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad, providing a scenic ride through the majestic San Juan Mountains for passengers was an important part of the train’s purpose from the start, along with hauling hauling gold and silver ore to...
Cover Image
Format:
Collection
These postcards depict the early days of Durango, Colorado. According to The City of Durango, the town was created by the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad Company in September 1880 as a location for smelters to work the silver and gold being mined nearby. Durango’s more moderate climate at an elevation of 6,512 feet above sea level, a steady water supply from the Animas River, and the availability of coal made it a good choice. The city was named...
Cover Image
Format:
Collection
These mountain towns are gems in Southwest Colorado. Telluride and tiny Ophir are in San Miguel County, and Ouray, not far away if unimproved roads aren’t a barrier, is located in Ouray County. Telluride is the most populous (about two thousand residents) and best known of the three, home to a famous ski resort, many well-known music festivals, and exclusive luxury homes. Telluride’s colorful history as a hard-rock mining town where gold, silver,...
Cover Image
Format:
Collection
Silverton, Colorado, is a National Historic Landmark nestled in the high San Juan mountains. According to the Town of Silverton, it became a center for the many regional silver and gold mining camps in 1874. The town has a rowdy “Old West” past that its residents are happy to say hasn’t entirely left. Silverton is found along the San Juan Skyway, which includes the “Million Dollar Highway,” supposedly one of the most dangerous roads in the...
Cover Image
Format:
Collection
According to the U.S. National Park Service, Mesa Verde National Park features 5,000 known archeological sites, including 600 spectacular cliff dwellings. The name is Spanish for “Green Table,” and the area was inhabited by the Ancestral Pueblo people from AD 600 to 1300, over 700 years. (source) Mesa Verde, as well as nearby Aztec Ruins National Monument located in Aztec, New Mexico,...
Cover Image
Format:
Collection
From Montrose to Cortez to Pagosa Springs, southwest Colorado includes many towns with interesting history, significant natural and cultural resources, and other facets that have been pictured on postcards.